1/48th kit Egyptian style cabinet, quarter scale

1/48th kit Egyptian style cabinet, quarter scale

1/48th Egyptian style cabinet.

 

Flat packed, in kit form and ready for construction in colours of your own choosing. Bead colour may vary.

 

Size: 2.4 cms wide x 2.3 cms high x 1.7 cms wide.

 

I combine postage, so please send me a message to discuss. 

 

Ancient Egyptian gods were originally shown wearing headdresses to symbolize that they were the first mythical kings, even before creation. These crowns set them apart from the common people in pictures and statues.

Royal clothing is particularly well documented, as well as the clothing and crowns of the Pharaohs. The pharaohs would often wear animal skins, usually leopard or lion, as a sign of their station.

From about 2130 BC during the Old Kingdom, garments were simple. The men wore wrap around skirts known as the shendyt, which were belted at the waist, sometimes pleated or gathered in the front. During this time, men’s skirts were short. As the Middle Kingdom of Egypt (1600 BC), came, the skirt was worn longer. Then, around 1420 BC, there was a light tunic or blouse with sleeves, as well as a pleated petticoat.

During the Old, Middle and New Kingdom, ancient Egyptian women mostly wore a simple sheath dress called a kalasiris.[3] Women’s clothing in ancient Egypt was more conservative than men’s clothing. The dresses were held up by one or two straps and were worn down to the ankle, while the upper edge could be worn above or below the breasts. The length of the dress denoted the social class of the wearer.[4] Beading or feathers were also used as an embellishment on the dress.[5] Over the dress, women had a choice of wearing shawls, capes, or robes. The shawl was a piece of fine linen cloth around 4 feet wide by 13 or 14 feet long. This was mostly worn pleated as well.

Until the mid-Eighteenth Dynasty women wore a tight-fitting sheath dress, a simple garment that falls from just below the breasts to just above the ankles, being held up by two shoulder straps. On statues the straps cover the breasts, but in painting and relief the single breast depicted in profile is exposed. The dress hugs the body with no slack. Also when women are shown in movement, sitting or kneeling, the dress still clings to the outline of the body as if elasticated. However Egyptian clothes were mostly made from linen, which tends to sag. Surviving dresses consist of a body made from a tube of material sewn up one side, supported not by straps but by a bodice with sleeves. In contrast to dresses shown in art, such linen garments tend to be baggy, and would conceal rather than reveal the body.

 

Designed and laser cut by Raptoor

    7,00 €Price